Untitled

Jan 09

hahafunnylol:

I usually brush my teeth before breakfast…
More

hahafunnylol:

I usually brush my teeth before breakfast…

More

thisbeatsforallmyfreaks:

This is accurate.

thisbeatsforallmyfreaks:

This is accurate.

(Source: whatdoyoumeanunicornsdontexist)

Jan 04

cwnl:

Starburst Galaxy IC 10

Lurking behind dust and stars near the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy, IC 10 is a mere 2.3 million light-years distant.

Even though its light is dimmed by intervening dust, the irregular dwarf galaxy still shows off vigorous star-forming regions that shine with a telltale reddish glow in this colorful skyscape.

Image Credit & Copyright: Dietmar Hager, Torsten Grossmann

cwnl:

Starburst Galaxy IC 10

Lurking behind dust and stars near the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy, IC 10 is a mere 2.3 million light-years distant.

Even though its light is dimmed by intervening dust, the irregular dwarf galaxy still shows off vigorous star-forming regions that shine with a telltale reddish glow in this colorful skyscape.

Image Credit & Copyright: Dietmar Hager, Torsten Grossmann

(Source: kenobi-wan-obi)

crystilogic:

“Les principales glandes endocrines,” from Joseph Handler, Le Livre de la Santé, Vol. 7: Le système endocrinien (1967) (illus. Jean-Paul Goude).

crystilogic:

“Les principales glandes endocrines,” from Joseph Handler, Le Livre de la Santé, Vol. 7: Le système endocrinien (1967) (illus. Jean-Paul Goude).

(Source: ajourneyroundmyskull.blogspot.com, via fuckyeahmedicaldiagrams)

Dec 28

[video]

theweekmagazine:

Global carbon output is higher than ever. New figures released by the Global Carbon Project show that 2012 saw a record jump in emissions from fossil-fuel burning, thanks mostly to unprecedented leaps from developing nations. Here, some numbers from the report:
510 millionExtra tons of CO2 pumped into the air in  2010, “almost certainly the largest absolute jump in any year since the  Industrial Revolution, and the largest percentage increase since 2003,”  says Justin Gillis at The New York Times.
9.14 billionTotal tons of CO2 pumped into the air in 2010
1Average percent that global emissions of CO2 rose each year during the 1990s
3Average percent that global emissions of CO2 rose each year during the 2000s
More numbers

theweekmagazine:

Global carbon output is higher than ever. New figures released by the Global Carbon Project show that 2012 saw a record jump in emissions from fossil-fuel burning, thanks mostly to unprecedented leaps from developing nations. Here, some numbers from the report:

More numbers

[video]

cwnl:

Geologists Find Source of Stonehenge’s Inner Stones

Imaged Above: Comet and Stonehenge /by John Goldsmith

A team of geologists from Britain have pinpointed the exact quarry that Stonehenge’s innermost circle of rocks came from. It’s the first time that a precise source has been found for any of the stones at the prehistoric monument.

Robert Ixer of the University of Leicester and Richard Bevins of the National Museum of Wales painstakingly identified samples from various rock outcrops in Pembrokeshire, Wales.
For nine months the pair used petrography — the study of mineral content and textural relationships within rocks — to find the origins of Stonehenge’s rhyolite debitage stones. These spotted dolerites or bluestones form the inner circle and inner horseshoe of the site.

The question remains though, as to how neolithic people transported huge chunks of rock from Wales to Wiltshire, some 5,000 years ago. Some historians reckon that these stone age builders quarried the stones in Pembrokeshire and brought them over to England, while others argue that giant glacial shifts moved the stones, hundreds of thousands of years earlier.

Ixer and Bevins hope that by finding the exact source for some of the monument’s stones, they will be able to discover new clues as to when and how they made their 160 mile journey.

The more well-known and iconic stones, the huge sarsens, were incorporated into the monument several centuries later. They came from somewhere in the Marlborough Downs, 20 miles north of Stonehenge.

cwnl:

Geologists Find Source of Stonehenge’s Inner Stones

Imaged Above: Comet and Stonehenge /by John Goldsmith

A team of geologists from Britain have pinpointed the exact quarry that Stonehenge’s innermost circle of rocks came from. It’s the first time that a precise source has been found for any of the stones at the prehistoric monument.

Robert Ixer of the University of Leicester and Richard Bevins of the National Museum of Wales painstakingly identified samples from various rock outcrops in Pembrokeshire, Wales. For nine months the pair used petrography — the study of mineral content and textural relationships within rocks — to find the origins of Stonehenge’s rhyolite debitage stones. These spotted dolerites or bluestones form the inner circle and inner horseshoe of the site.

The question remains though, as to how neolithic people transported huge chunks of rock from Wales to Wiltshire, some 5,000 years ago. Some historians reckon that these stone age builders quarried the stones in Pembrokeshire and brought them over to England, while others argue that giant glacial shifts moved the stones, hundreds of thousands of years earlier.

Ixer and Bevins hope that by finding the exact source for some of the monument’s stones, they will be able to discover new clues as to when and how they made their 160 mile journey.

The more well-known and iconic stones, the huge sarsens, were incorporated into the monument several centuries later. They came from somewhere in the Marlborough Downs, 20 miles north of Stonehenge.

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

(Source: ekstatics)

roylling:

 
First Photo of the Sun
This photo was taken by the French physicists Louis Fizeau and Leon Foucault on April 2, 1845, taking advantage of a relatively new technology.

roylling:

First Photo of the Sun

This photo was taken by the French physicists Louis Fizeau and Leon Foucault on April 2, 1845, taking advantage of a relatively new technology.

(Source: National Geographic)